Category Campus Facilities

Bigger, better but still home – Furman’s Trone Student Center is Reborn

 

The newly renovated and expanded Trone Student Center is Furman University’s latest success story.  The center’s renewal goes much deeper than a simple cosmetic upgrade. The innovative facility includes centralized student services such as the Office of Student Life, the Career Center, the Rinker Center for Study Away and International Education, and the Shucker Center for Leadership Development. Add in ample meeting space, a post office, and a Starbucks (yay!), and you have a multi-faceted resource for students, faculty, and staff that both looks good and feels good, the way great space should.

Along with new administrative offices, expanded student services, and a full-service restaurant, the Trone Student Center was designed to flow beyond the walls. SW+ Greenville’s senior landscape architect, Clint Rigsby, PLA, designed landscape/hardscape for the project.  He crafted the design, which includes the Hill Courtyard where the center’s dedication ceremony was recently held, to offer a comfortable and attractive outdoor gathering space for campus residents, visitors, and the public. The courtyard is the perfect place for a range of activities from hanging out with friends around the Point of View fire pit to an evening of live music. A new boardwalk along Furman Lake completes the revitalized center. Clint and the SW+ team worked with LS3P to deliver the new facility.

Trone Student Center Landscape Plan

Trone Student Center Landscape Plan

SW+ and Furman University have worked together on successful projects in the past including Lakeside Amphitheater and the plaza fronting the Hartness Welcome Center. We are excited to be continuing our relationship today with the expansion of the Mickel Tennis Center and Furman’s football stadium.

For more information on the Trone Student Center’s recent dedication, photos of the event can be found here on Flickr.


Slope Collapse Triggers Emergency Road Design

 

When unprecedented rainfall hit the upstate this summer, a slope failure at 51- year old upstate college nearly closed their Perimeter Road for the fall semester necessitating emergency road design.  SW+ was contacted by long-time client, Tri-County Technical College, to assess the slope failure and provide recommendations. Classes were scheduled to begin at the popular technical college in less than a month,  so developing a quick plan to provide a bypass road was critical.

Emergency Road DesignServices Necessary Due to Slope Failure

Slope failure along the entrance road caused by excessive summer rain.

SW+ reached out to Collins Hammett Construction to provide construction services for the emergency road design solution. Working together, SW+ and Collins Hammett were able to get the clearing and grading of the alternate road started within two days of completing the damage assessment.  In just three weeks, Collins Hammett and SW+ had successfully designed and constructed a bypass road around the failing slope on the college’s Pendleton Campus.  When classes began for the fall semester, this very important bypass road was vital to the traffic at the college.

SeamonWhiteside’s Greenville office is now developing construction drawings to remediate the slope failure and provide permanent stabilization to the affected area.

Tri-County Technical College has been providing secondary education since 1962. The college serves Anderson, Pickens, and Oconee counties in the upstate of South Carolina.


Projects: James E. Clyburn Research Center at MUSC


The Urban Edge Studio of SW+A recently completed the landscape architectural design for the James E. Clyburn Research Center at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC).

UES worked with Columbia based architects Stevens and Wilkinson and Boston based architects Goody Clancy on the overall design. The James E. Clyburn Research Center is comprised chiefly of the Drug Discovery Building and the Bio-Engineering Building. The site is located near the heart of campus at President and Bee Streets in downtown Charleston and was previously a surface parking lot. The project is slated to be certified as LEED Silver. The project, from a landscape architectural aspect, is comprised of four main areas: the front plaza, the Medicinal Garden, the North Garden and the MUSC Urban Farm.

The large front plaza(http://www.postandcourier.com/article/20111121/PC1602/311219923) addresses the challenge of transitioning from the grade of the street to the required building elevation and accommodating major pedestrian axes while creating an area for sitting, eating lunch, having a conversation with a colleague, or as a respite from the laboratory and the classroom. The landscape addresses many of the sustainability aspects of the project including water quality, reduced irrigation, reduced urban island heat effect, and use of local and recycled materials.

Located to the west of the Drug Discovery Building, between the Basic Sciences Building and the Colbert Library is the MUSC Porcher Medicinal Garden.

This area was previously a loading dock area and has been raised about 3 feet to the grade of the surrounding buildings. (http://waring.library.musc.edu/exhibits/PMG/about.php). The garden is a tribute to Dr. Francis Peyre Porcher, an MUSC alumnus and professor who served as a physician during the Civil War. The garden is planted with more than forty species of plants selected from those cataloged in Dr. Porcher’s Resources of the Southern Fields and Forests (1863). Each plant grouping has an interpretive sign that provides information about its medicinal uses. The plants are located in raised planters of Cor-Ten steel, allowing visitors to have a close up view of each plant.

The North Garden serves as a place holder for future buildings, as called for in the campus master plan. It also provides one of the largest open space areas on the campus and the surrounding neighborhood. Several large live oaks, once confined to parking lot islands, were preserved and incorporated into the layout. Sidewalks, benches, and plantings – mostly native species create a comfortable campus landscape that is enjoyed by many on a regular basis.

Located within the North Garden area, just behind the brick wall on Bee Street, is the almost half acre MUSC Urban Farm.

The urban farm was developed with the following Goal Statement: “The MUSC Urban Farm will be a place that cultivates a healthier community by growing crops and social connections while educating and inspiring people with local, nutritious, and delicious food.” UES worked with MUSC staff and Elizabeth Beak of Crop Up (http://www.crop-up.com/) to bring the farm into existence. MUSC conducts “Work and Learn” session where people can learn about eating healthier and growing their own food while taking home some of the food they have harvested. The farm is designed with raised beds, drip irrigation, and mulched pathways. Over 50 varieties of heirloom herbs, fruits and vegetables are raised year round in the farm area.

According to project manager Wade Gatlin of MUSC,  “this $80 million project has fundamentally raised the bar on design excellence in terms of architecture and landscape architecture for the MUSC campus.”  He also said that he “can happily recommend Urban Edge Studio for their ability to engage clients in thoughtful goal setting and consensus building, for their highly detailed solutions and their overall creative vision.” This project, which lasted over five years from beginning to end, presented many design challenges which the UES design team (Bill Eubanks, Russ Seamon and Haley Weeks) met with creativity, insight, and innovation.

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